Annie WALLEN and the Cumberland Gap: Too Far From Family, Too Close to Home – 52 Ancestors (2015 #9)

This is a heart-wrenching story. It is very, very sad.

It is a story of my son’s 5th great grandmother, Mary Annie (SAWYER) WALLEN, and her losses during the American Civil War.

Mary Annie SAWYER was born 19 February 1816, in South Carolina.1 Her husband was William L. WALLEN.2 They lived in Buncombe and Madison Counties, North Carolina. By 1860, William and Annie had at least six children, all boys ages 6 to 22. I would expect that there were children lost during their lives, or possibly some I do not know about, as there are gaps in birth years. In 1850, William was a laborer in Buncombe County,3 and in 1860, he was a tenant farmer with a personal estate value of $150 in Madison County. He owned no land at that time.4

In 1862, William WALLEN and his two oldest sons went off to war, leaving Annie with four sons to care for.

Only one of the three men came home.

Annie’s husband William enlisted in Madison County, North Carolina, on 10 May 1862, in the 64th Regiment Infantry, Company A.5 On 17 July 1862, two months after William had left for war, Annie’s two oldest sons, Reuben Benjamin WALLEN6 and Archibald T. “Arch” WALLEN (aka, A. B. WALLEN),7 enlisted in Company F of the 64th Regiment Infantry at Marshall in Madison County.8,9

The 58th North Carolina Infantry was stationed at Big Creek Gap, Campbell County, in late December 1862, and throughout that winter. On 20 February 1863, several battalions and regiments were added to the forces there, including part of the 64th North Carolina Infantry.10 It was this move that put William L. WALLEN into the middle of Union forces at Jacksboro on 13 March 1863, when he died.11 We have no recorded cause of death for William; however, Campbell County had voted against secession and was Union sympathizing.12 The danger to the Confederate forces was great. One hundred twenty miles from home, William was gone. He, along with approximately 124 of his fellow men, died at the base of Pine Mountain during that time period.13 Annie had lost her husband to the Cumberland Gap.

We read published letters home from soldiers describing the conditions they lived and fought under during this war. We know that they suffered, regardless of the side on which they served. But William was illiterate.14 He may not have sent any letters home to Annie.

How Annie would have known William was lost – when she would have been notified – is a question that will probably remain a mystery. But her husband was never coming home. She would never see him or his body again. She would grieve, yet have no grave over which to grieve. Her boys had lost their father, and their father’s body, to a bloody and ugly war that struck hard in the beautiful Cumberland Gap.

Annie was left with no property,15 very little to no income,16 and four sons, ages 9-17, to raise. She may have had hope that her husband and two oldest sons would be home soon. She may have prayed every morning, noon, and night that the war would end and that her men would arrive home safely. In early 1863, she had yet to understand the depth of grief she would soon experience.

At the time he enlisted in July 1862, my son’s 4th great grandfather Reuben, son of William and Annie, had a pregnant wife,17 Lucinda Minerva (PENLAND),18 and one daughter, Mary Elizabeth, who was almost 2.19

Neither Reuben nor Minerva could read or write.20 They could not have exchanged letters unless they were dictated to someone who was literate. Minerva could have had as little knowledge about the status of her husband as did her mother-in-law about her own. They both may have lived in a constant state of anxiety and suspense. We can imagine Minerva in the spring of 1863, holding her baby, with Mary Elizabeth, a toddler, at her feet, silently cursing the war, praying to or cursing her God, trying to maintain hope that her husband, too, was safe and would soon be home.

The women and the children – it was their futures that were so precarious. It was their emotions that were so torn and worn. The war was hell on the women. It was not fair to the children. It hurt everyone.

In the 1860 census, Reuben’s brother Archibald was not married.21 There is a slightly odd record within William’s compiled military file. An A.B. Wallen, widow, made a claim for settlement on 17 November 1863.22 Was this the wife of Archibald making the claim on behalf of her mother-in-law?

Two women, possibly three, awaiting the return of their loved ones. We can see that by November of the year 1863, the family knew that William had died. Now they knew: William was never coming home.

The 64th North Carolina Infantry was one of the six Confederate forces stationed at the Cumberland Gap in September 1863.23 The so-called Battle of the Cumberland Gap was ultimately no battle at all. To the Confederate soldiers involved, it was a useless surrender of their 2,300 lives by the incompetent, dishonest, and/or cowardly24 General John W. Frazer, the commander of the 5th Brigade of the Army of Tennessee,25 which included the 64th North Carolina Infantry under Lieutenant Colonel William N. Garrett.26 To the Union forces, it was a deception against the Confederacy which allowed them to take control of the strategic location, without bloodshed, and hold it until the end of the war.27

General Ambrose Burnside's Union forces passing through Cumberland Gap in September 1863 during the American Civil War. Public domain.

General Ambrose Burnside’s Union forces passing through Cumberland Gap in September 1863 during the American Civil War. Public domain.

Reuben and Arch were two of the 2,300 surrendered soldiers who were taken prisoners of war at the Battle of Cumberland Gap on 9 September 1863.28 The captured soldiers were taken to Louisville, Kentucky, and then on to Camp Douglas in Chicago, Illinois, where they were received on 26 September 1863.29 The next two years were to be living hell for the Wallen brothers.

Keep in mind that even though by November, the family knew that William had died in March, the brothers may not have. But if they did know, their morale, already low because of their capture, would have sunk even further. Imagine how difficult it would have been to maintain the will to carry on. Reuben would have held on for his wife and daughter, and Archibald for a possible wife or for his family of origin. Some soldiers escaped.

But Reuben and Arch did not escape.

Camp Douglas

The conditions at Camp Douglas were horrendous and became worse as time went on.

Inmates were deprived of blankets, medical treatment, and food. To the immediate south of the camp stood the University of Chicago, from which seminary students provided charitable aid to the prisoners when allowed to do so by the camp commanders. At one point, some prisoners ate a dog, and even rat meat came to be regarded as a delicacy. The president of the U.S. Sanitary Commission once inspected the prison and gave a report of an “amount of standing water, of unpoliced grounds, of foul sinks, of general disorder, of soil reeking with miasmic accretions, of rotten bones and emptying of camp kettles…..enough to drive a sanitarian mad.” The barracks were so horrendous, he said, that “nothing but fire can cleanse them.”30

From Wikipedia, most of which is attributed to George Levy’s To Die in Chicago: Confederate Prisoners at Camp Douglas 1862–1865, Gretna, Louisiana: Pelican Publishing Company, revised edition 1999, original edition 1994.

Strict discipline and abuse of the prisoners increased at this time [April 1864]. Colonel Strong gave more power to patrols and put each barracks under control of a sergeant, two corporals and five privates. Some of these individuals were vindictive and even dangerous…. A new dungeon about 20 feet (6.1 m) and 7 feet (2.1 m) high, with two small air holes, was built in Prisoner’s Square. Three men spent a night there for climbing a roof to watch horse racing. Punishment through extensive use of ball and chain, using a 32-pound (15 kg) cannonball chained to a prisoner’s leg, began. Some prisoners received this punishment for reneging on a request to take the oath of allegiance to the United States.31

Two months later:

By June 1864, guards had set up “the mule” or “wooden horse,” a sawhorse-type device set about 4 feet (1.2 m) off the ground, later raised to 15 feet (4.6 m). It had a thin, almost sharp, edge and was used as punishment; prisoners were forced to sit on it. Prisoners used their hands to brace themselves when on the device, but a Confederate prisoner reported seeing men forced to sit on it until they fainted and fell off. Sometimes weights were tied to the prisoner’s feet. The device, which was outside, was used in any type of weather.32

An account of it by a prisoner at Camp Douglas:

There were some of our poor boys, for little infraction of the prison rules, riding what they called Morgan’s mule every day. That was one mule that did the worst standing stock still. He was built after the pattern of those used by carpenters. He was about fifteen feet high; the legs were nailed to the scantling so one of the sharp edges was turned up, which made it very painful and uncomfortable to the poor fellow especially when he had to be ridden bareback, sometimes with heavy weights fastened to his feet and sometimes with a large beef bone in each hand. This performance was carried on under the eyes of a guard with a loaded gun, and was kept up for several days; each ride lasting two hours each day unless the fellow fainted and fell off from pain and exhaustion. Very few were able to walk after this hellish Yankee torture but had to be supported to their barracks.33

One year after they arrived at Camp Douglas, on 26 September 1864, Arch, who must have been in severe pain, thirsty, cold, hungry, and in living in squalor, died of dysentery.34 One cannot possibly wonder why:

In October 1864, 984 of 7,402 prisoners were reported as sick in the barracks. Meanwhile, in November 1864, as repairs were being carried out, water was cut off to the camp and even to the hospital. Prisoners had to risk being shot in order to gather snow, even beyond the dead line, for coffee and other uses.35

Reuben was held in prison with the other surviving soldiers until the end of the war and was released 16 June 1865.36 He survived, and after all he had gone through, I think we can perhaps say that he barely survived.

On May 8, 1865, Colonel (and by this time, Brevet Brigadier General) Sweet received the order to release all prisoners except those above the rank of colonel. Those who took the oath of allegiance were provided transportation home but those who did not were on their own. About 1,770 prisoners refused to take the oath.37

Reuben took the oath of allegiance to the United States of America.38

The Wallen Bodies

The bodies of the Confederate soldiers who died in Campbell County, Tennessee, including William’s, are buried in unknown locations in what is known as DeLap Cemetery in Jacksboro.39 Confederate stones have been placed for 50 of them, including Pvt. William L. Wallen.40 The stones do not mark the actual places of burial, but memorialize those who served the Confederate cause and whose records show that they died there.41

Memorial military marker for Pvt William L. Wallen, DeLap Cemetery, Jacksboro, Campbell County, Tennessee. Photo used with permission from FIndAGrave user Larry & Edie Doepel (#46583214).

Memorial military marker for Pvt William L. Wallen, DeLap Cemetery, Jacksboro, Campbell County, Tennessee. Photo used with permission from FindAGrave user Larry & Edie Doepel (#46583214).

The horrors of Camp Douglas, though, extended even to the dead.

The camp officials contracted with an unscrupulous undertaker, C. H. Jordan, who sold some of the bodies of Confederate prisoners to medical schools and had the rest buried in shallow graves without coffins. Some bodies reportedly were even dumped in Lake Michigan, only to wash up on its shores.42

Archibald’s body was one of the lucky ones.

Many dead prisoners’ bodies initially were buried in unmarked paupers’ graves in Chicago’s City Cemetery (located on the site of today’s Lincoln Park). In 1867 their bodies were reinterred at what is now known as Confederate Mound in Oak Woods Cemetery (5 miles (8.0 km) south of the former Camp Douglas).43

Archibald’s body was buried in City Cemetery.44 It is now in Oak Woods Cemetery.45

Conclusion

Maybe if Annie could have gone back to 1862, the year they enlisted, or to early 1863, the day the decision was made to send the 64th North Carolina Regiment Infantry to Jacksboro, or to 9 September 1863, the day Frazer surrendered – if she could have gone back and changed just one thing, two or all three of her men may have survived. They may have come home.

Perhaps she thought that many times, through tears or stoicism, perhaps while rocking her grandchildren, gazing above those mountains and thinking of that gap so close to home but that she would never see – that perhaps she didn’t want to see – the gap that took her men away.

The Cumberland Gap.

To Annie, I would imagine all it represented was death.


Author’s Note: Because I have no Confederate Civil War ancestors, this was my first look at how the American Civil War affected lives in the American South. It was eye-opening. Had I been alive then, I would have been a part of a family that was Union because of who my ancestors were and where they lived. I already knew that the War was bloody for both sides, but this exercise, like so many of the other articles I have written on this blog, has changed me for the better, opening my heart and mind and giving me a deeper understanding of humanity.


Citations

1.^ “Mary Annie (Sawyer) Wallen,” Find A Grave memorial, (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=112555748 : accessed 3 March 2015). Find A Grave.

2.^ “Pvt William L. Wallen,” Find A Grave memorial, (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=11430588 : accessed 3 March 2015). Find A Grave.

3.^ 1850 U.S. census, Buncombe County, North Carolina, population schedule, page 327B (stamped), dwelling 1809, family 1809, lines 19, William Walden [sic]; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 March 2015), image 282, citing National Archives microfilm publication M432, roll 622.

4.^ 1860 U.S. census, Madison County, North Carolina, population schedule, page 305 (stamped), dwelling 145, family 145, line 24, William Wallen; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 March 2015), image 21, citing National Archives microfilm publication M653, roll 905.

5.^ “Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of North Carolina.,” digital images, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com/image/55491782/ : accessed 5 March 2015), Civil War Service Records>>Confederate Records>North Carolina>Sixty-fourth Infantry (11th Battalion, Allen’s Regiment)>W>Wallen, William L>Page 4; citing National Archives microfilm publication Carded Records Showing Military Service of Soldiers Who Fought in Confederate Organizations , compiled 1903 – 1927, documenting the period 1861 – 1865, M270, roll 558, record group 109.

6.^ “Reuben Benjamin Wallen,” Find A Grave memorial, (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=mr&MRid=48626267 : accessed 3 March 2015). Find A Grave. Gives full name, which I cannot find anyplace else at this time.

7.^ “Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of North Carolina.,” digital images, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com/image/20/55491662/ : accessed 5 March 2015), Civil War Service Records>Confederate Records>North Carolina>Sixty-fourth Infantry (11th Battalion, Allen’s Regiment)>W>Wallen, Archibald B>Pages 1-13. Envelope includes cards with the following names, all representing the same man: A. B. Wallen, A. B. Worley, A. R. Wallen, A. T. Wallen, Arch T. Wallen, Archibald Y. Wallin, Archibald T. Wallen, Archie Walen, and Archibald T. Wallin.

8.^ “Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of North Carolina.,” digital images, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com/image/20/55491663/ : accessed 5 March 2015), Civil War Service Records>Confederate Records>North Carolina>Sixty-fourth Infantry (11th Battalion, Allen’s Regiment)>W>Wallen, Archibald B>Page 2.

9.^ “Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of North Carolina.,” digital images, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com/image/20/55491737/ : accessed 5 March 2015), Civil War Service Records>Confederate Records>North Carolina>Sixty-fourth Infantry (11th Battalion, Allen’s Regiment)>W>Wallen, Reuben B>Page 2.

10.^ Jeffrey Craig Weaver, “58th North Carolina Infantry, Confederate States Army” (http://www.26nc.org/History/58th-History/58th%20history.html : accessed 4 March 2015), Society for the Historical Preservation of the 26th Regiment North Carolina Troops. 26th North Carolina Regiment (http://www.26nc.org/). Weaver states that Colonel J.B. Palmer commanded a brigade (Palmer’s Brigade) which was stationed at Big Creek Gap, Campbell County, Tennessee, (now known as LaFollette) when, on 20 February 1863, strength was added to Palmer’s Command, including the 64th North Carolina Regiment.

11.^ “Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of North Carolina.,” digital images, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com/image/20/55491784/ : accessed 3 March 2015), Civil War Service Records>Confederate Records>North Carolina>Sixty-fourth Infantry (11th Battalion, Allen’s Regiment)>W>Wallen, William L>Page 5. “Died at Jacksborough Tenn on the 13 day of Mar 1863. Substitute for M.H. Merrell.”

12.^ Dallas Bogan, “The Civil War In and Around Campbell County, Tennessee” (http://www.tngenweb.org/campbell/hist-bogan/civilwar.html : accessed 3 March 2015), Campbell County TNGenWeb Project. Campbell County TNGenWeb (http://www.tngenweb.org/campbell/). Bogan writes, “Of the 1059 votes cast in Campbell County, only 59 favored secession.”

13.^ “Confederate Grave Yard Found in Campbell County” (http://www.tngenweb.org/campbell/cemetery/listings/delap.html : accessed 4 March 2015), Campbell County TNGenWeb Project. Campbell County TNGenWeb (http://www.tngenweb.org/campbell/), originally published in The Campbell Countian.

14.^ 1850 U.S. census, Buncombe County, North Carolina, population schedule, page 327B (stamped), dwelling 1809, family 1809, line 19, William Walden [sic]. William is marked as unable to read and write. In the 1860 U.S. census, however, he is not.

15.^ 1860 U.S. census, Madison County, North Carolina, population schedule, page 305 (stamped), dwelling 145, family 145, line 24, William Wallen. William owns no real property, so unless he purchased some between this census and the time he died, Annie would have none to inherit from him.

16.^ [Anonymous], “North Carolina Confederate Soldier’s and Widow’s Pension Applications (FamilySearch Historical Records),” (https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/North_Carolina_Confederate_Soldier’s_and_Widow’s_Pension_Applications_(FamilySearch_Historical_Records) : accessed 4 March 2015). Family History Research Wiki (https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Main_Page). The first pension law in North Carolina for Confederate veterans and widows was not passed until 1885, three years after Annie’s death.

17.^ “North Carolina, Deaths, 1931-1994,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FPNN-M6G : accessed 6 March 2015), Lou Wallen Burrell, 10 May 1938; citing Asheville, Buncombe, North Carolina, fn 2026 cn 176, State Department of Archives and History, Raleigh; FHL microfilm 1,943,151. Birth date 6 September 1862, so Minerva would have been about 7 months pregnant when Reuben enlisted.

18.^ a. “North Carolina, Marriages, 1759-1979,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8ML-M5H : accessed 6 March 2015), Reuben Wallen and Minerva Penland, 8 April 1858; citing Buncombe, North Carolina, reference p 719; FHL microfilm 412,576. Minerva’s maiden name is given as Penland.
b. 1850 U.S. census, Buncombe County, North Carolina, population schedule, page 196 (stamped), dwelling 12, family 12, line 17, Lucinda Penland; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 March 2015), image 3, citing National Archives microfilm publication M432, roll 622. There is a 9 year-old Lucinda Penland in this household which is probably her as a child.
c. 1870 U.S. census, Buncombe County, North Carolina, population schedule, Reems Creek, page 244 (stamped), dwelling 60, family 65, line 4, L. Manerva Wallen; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 March 2015), image 5, citing National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 1125. Her first initial is given as L and there is a child Lucinda on line 6 in this family.
d. “Lucinda Minerva (Penland) Wallen,” Find A Grave memorial, (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=121761463 : accessed 3 March 2015). Find A Grave. Full name given as Lucinda Minerva Penland Wallen. Short biography says she was the daughter of James Hughey Penland and Mary Hyatt, and wife of Reuben B Wallen.
Conclusion: With the combined evidence in this citation, I can say that her name was probably Lucinda Minerva Penland.

19.^1900 U.S. census, Buncombe County, North Carolina, population schedule, Big Ivy, Enumeration District (ED) 148, sheet 1, p. 301A (stamped), dwelling 10, family 10, Mary E. Banks; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 March 2015), citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 1184. Mary E. Banks’ birth month and year is given as Sept. 1860, meaning she would have been 2 when Minerva’s second child was born.

20.^ 1860 U.S. census, Buncombe County, North Carolina, population schedule, page 236 (not stamped), dwelling 141, family 141, lines 6-7, Reuben and Menerva Wallan; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 March 2015), image 19, citing National Archives microfilm publication M653, roll 889. Reuben and Menerva are both marked as cannot read or write.

21.^ 1860 U.S. census, Madison County, North Carolina, population schedule, page 305 (stamped), dwelling 145, family 145, line 24, William Wallen; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 March 2015), image 21, citing National Archives microfilm publication M653, roll 905. Arch is living with parents in this census. The 1850 U.S. census did not record marital statuses.

22.^ “Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of North Carolina.,” digital images, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com/image/20/55491779/ : accessed 5 March 2015), Civil War Service Records>Confederate Records>North Carolina>Sixty-fourth Infantry (11th Battalion, Allen’s Regiment)>W>Wallen, William L>Page 3.

23.^ “Battle of the Cumberland Gap (1863),” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Cumberland_Gap_(1863) : accessed 3 March 2015). Wikipedia. The 64th North Carolina Infantry Regiment is listed as one of the Confederate opposing forces.

24.^ Matthew D. Parker, “Surrender of the Cumberland Gap” (http://thomaslegion.net/gap.html : accessed 4 March 2015). Thomas’ Legion : The 69th North Carolina Regiment (http://www.thomaslegion.net/). Confederate General John W. Frazer had been given a “fight or retreat” order which he ultimately ignored when he surrendered. “Jefferson Davis…[wrote] that Frazier’s surrender ‘presents a shameful abandonment of duty.'” Additionally, there were thoughts that perhaps Frazer was bribed or that he slandered men of the regiments under his command when no evidence supported his claims.

25.^ “John W. Frazer,” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_W._Frazer : accessed 4 March 2015). Wikipedia. Frazer was given command of the 5th Brigade of the Army of Tennessee in July 1863.

26.^ “Battle of the Cumberland Gap (1863),” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Cumberland_Gap_(1863) : accessed 3 March 2015). Wikipedia. The 64th North Carolina Infantry Regiment is listed as one of the Confederate opposing forces, and it’s commander is given as Lieutenant Colonel William N. Garrett.

27.^ “John W. Frazer,” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_W._Frazer : accessed 4 March 2015). Wikipedia. Regarding the Battle of the Cumberland Gap: “Burnside had succeeded in deceiving Frazer, leading him to believe that the opposing Federals were much stronger than they appeared.” and “No blood was shed in the three-day Battle of the Cumberland Gap.”

28.^ “Selected Records of the War Department Relating to Confederate Prisoners of War, 1861-1865,” digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 March 2015), image 37509, lines 28-29, citing National Archives microfilm publication War Department Collection of Confederate Records, M598, roll 57, record group 109.

29.^ Ibid.

30.^ “80 Acres of Hell – Camp Douglas,” (http://joewheeler863scv.tripod.com/80 Acres of Hell – Camp Douglas.htm : accessed 4 March 2015).

31.^ “Camp Douglas (Chicago),” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Douglas_(Chicago) : accessed 4 March 2015). Wikipedia.

32.^ Ibid.

33.^ “Wooden horse (device),” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wooden_horse_(device) : accessed 5 March 2015). Wikipedia.

34.^ “Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of North Carolina.,” digital images, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com/image/20/55491694/ : accessed 5 March 2015), Civil War Service Records>Confederate Records>North Carolina>Sixty-fourth Infantry (11th Battalion, Allen’s Regiment)>W>Wallen, Archibald B>Page 12.

35.^ “Camp Douglas (Chicago),” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Douglas_(Chicago) : accessed 4 March 2015). Wikipedia.

36.^ “Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of North Carolina.,” digital images, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com/image/20/55491757/ : accessed 5 March 2015), Civil War Service Records>Confederate Records>North Carolina>Sixty-fourth Infantry (11th Battalion, Allen’s Regiment)>W>Wallen, Reuben B>Page 10. Discharged June 16, 1865.

37.^ “Camp Douglas (Chicago),” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Douglas_(Chicago) : accessed 4 March 2015). Wikipedia.

38.^ “Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of North Carolina.,” digital images, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com/image/20/55491761/ : accessed 5 March 2015), Civil War Service Records>Confederate Records>North Carolina>Sixty-fourth Infantry (11th Battalion, Allen’s Regiment)>W>Wallen, Reuben B>Page 11. This is an abstract stating that Reuben B. Wallen’s name appeared as a signature to an Oath of Allegiance to the United States “date and place not stated.” Gleaned from this sheet: Reuben signed his oath by a mark, he was 5’5″ with fair complexion, light hair, and blue eyes. His place of residence was Buncombe Co., N.C.. There is also “Greenville Tenn” in the Remarks space. It does not specify what this notation means.

39.^ “DeLap Cemetery,” (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=11264 : accessed 4 March 2015). Find A Grave.

40.^ “Pvt William L. Wallen,” Find A Grave memorial, (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=11430588 : accessed 3 March 2015). Find A Grave.

41.^ “Delap Cemetery,” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delap_Cemetery, accessed 3 March 2015), Wikipedia.

42.^ “Camp Douglas (Chicago),” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Douglas_(Chicago) : accessed 4 March 2015). Wikipedia.

43.^ Ibid.

44.^ “Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of North Carolina.,” digital images, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com/image/20/55491694/ : accessed 5 March 2015), Civil War Service Records>Confederate Records>North Carolina>Sixty-fourth Infantry (11th Battalion, Allen’s Regiment)>W>Wallen, Archibald B>Page 12.

45.^ “Archibald T Wallen,” Find A Grave memorial, (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=40107604 : accessed 3 March 2015). Find A Grave.

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6 Responses to Annie WALLEN and the Cumberland Gap: Too Far From Family, Too Close to Home – 52 Ancestors (2015 #9)

  1. Excellent post but so very sad. Family history research is such a great way to make history come alive. It becomes personal. I don’t know if your son is old enough to have an interest just now but it’s wonderful that you are doing this for him too.

    Like

  2. 45 source citations! You did an incredible job researching this for your son.

    Like

  3. Pingback: Diggin’ Up Graves – Favorite Posts of 2014 and 2015 | Diggin' Up Graves

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