Isaac VAN DUYN (1822-1903) – Willing to Fight, Lost His Sight – 52 Ancestors

Isaac VAN DUYN (1822-1903) – Willing to Fight, Lost His Sight – 52 Ancestors

Isaac VAN DUYN was born on 15 May 1822 in Ohio.1,2 Many undocumented family trees say he was born in Belmont County, Ohio, although I have yet to find credible evidence of this. Some trees say his parents are Isaac and Anna (DAVIS) VAN DUYN. I have no credible evidence of this yet, either. I have not exhausted all resources.

On 5 June 1845 in Henry County, Indiana, Isaac married Phebe JUDGE.3 Their first child, George W. VAN DUYN, was either born in March 1845 or March 1846, depending upon in which source you look.4,5,6,7

Isaac Vanduyn and Phebe Judg marriage record, Henry County, Indiana

“Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XXFT-29X : accessed 6 November 2015), Isaac Vanduyn and Phebe Judg, 1845.

Regardless of the date of birth of Isaac and Phebe’s first born, George, the first three children born to Isaac and Phebe are almost consistently reported on the U.S. Federal Censuses as having been born in Iowa.8 This means Isaac and Phebe’s residence in Iowa would have been from c. 1845 – c. 1853. In the 1850 Census, Isaac Van Duyn and his family resided in Lee County, Iowa, and Isaac worked as a laborer and owned no real property.9 In 1860, the family was back in Indiana.10

If Phebe were actually pregnant with George when they went to Iowa, It seems that there would have been no reason for them to go back to Indiana to get married. That’s a long trek for a pregnant woman to take in 1845. So either George was born in 1845 before they left Indiana, or in 1846 in Iowa. I suspect the latter, specifically in March 1846 in Iowa, but don’t hold me to it.

Phebe JUDGE was also born in Ohio on 18 September 1828.11 Her parents were John JUDGE, whose German name was Hans RICHTER, and Mary Polly DRAKE.12 RICHTER is a German word for “judge.” In German, it is pronounced “reester.”

According to the detailed research by a cousin, John and Mary (DRAKE) JUDGE moved to Iowa from Indiana c. 1843.13 Whether this influenced Isaac VAN DUYN’s decision to move from Indiana to Iowa is not known to me. However, it is reported that within two years of John JUDGE’s move to Iowa, he drowned.14 Thus, at about the same time as the death of her father, Phebe (JUDGE) VAN DUYN was moving with her family to where her father died.15 The 1850 U.S. Federal Census shows a Mary JUDGE residing in Lee County, Iowa, District 29, dwelling 832, family 838.16 This is just a few doors down from Isaac and Phebe (JUDGE) VAN DUYN who were living in Lee County, District 29, dwelling 838, family 844.17 This Mary is probably Phebe’s mother.

Union Flag

After his stay in Iowa, Isaac returned home to Henry County, Indiana, near Shirley. The 1860 U.S. Census shows a personal estate of $420 and no real estate.18 He and Phebe had another five children before Isaac went off to fight for the Union in the Civil War in 1862 in Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry Regiment out of Richmond, Indiana.19,20 He became sick with “intermittent fever” shortly after the battle of Richmond, Kentucky, and was furloughed home for a time.21 I suspect he was home for most of the time that Company H was being reorganized after the Battle of Richmond (KY) was lost on 30 August 1862.

The 69th was paroled and remained in Indiana until 27 November 1862, three months later, when it set off for Memphis, Tennessee. I wish we had more detail, but we are lucky to have a short biography of him written in Hazzard’s History of Henry County. From Hazzard:

[While furloughed, Isaac Van Duyn] was sick for several weeks and, although scarcely able to travel when his furlough expired, yet he promptly returned and rejoined his regiment and was with it continuously from that time until mustered out May 23, 1865. He returned home at the close of the war, broken in health by the hardships endured in many campaigns, and to his other afflictions was added the almost complete loss of eyesight. Notwithstanding the constant physical distress to which he was subjected, he lived for many years to experience the beneficence of the Nation whose integrity and honor he had bravely helped to defend.22

Isaac Van Duyn, portrait. From <em>Hazzard's History of Henry County, Military Edition, Volume 1</em>, 1906, page 444. Downloaded 5 November 2015 from Archive.org in PDF format. Out of copyright.

Isaac Van Duyn, portrait. From Hazzard’s History of Henry County, Military Edition, Volume 1, 1906, page 444. Downloaded 5 November 2015 from Archive.org in PDF format. Out of copyright.

If you look into the eyes of the portrait of the older Isaac, you can mistake for anger or sadness what is blindness, tiredness, and physical pain from a war that was particularly hard on him. An invalid’s pension for him was filed 26 August 1869, a little over 4 years after the War’s end.23

Regardless of his injuries, he and Phebe would carry on to have another four children, one with a seemingly odd birth date or birth year which might be easily explained if Isaac’s full Civil War file were at my fingertips.24

Although he lived past the age of 81 years, the cause of death is so sad and today would be extremely unlikely.

Isaac Van Duyn died of cholera.

The Hancock Democrat (Greenfield, Indiana), Thursday, September 10, 1903, page 8, Newspapers.com

Isaac Vanduyn died Sept. 6 [1903] at his late home, one mile north of Shirley, of cholera morbus, aged eighty-one years, three months and twenty-two days. Funeral Tuesday, 11 a m., at Harlen [sic] church, Rev. Beeson officiating. Interment at Harlan cemetery.25

He and Phebe are buried at Harlan Cemetery, Brown Township, Hancock County, Indiana, along with many of their children, relatives, and neighbors.26

Harlan Cemetery (Hancock County, Indiana; 2 miles N of Wilkinson at Co. Rd. 1000 E and Co. Rd. 900 N, Brown township, Section 22), Isaac and Phebe VanDuyn marker, photographed by this author, March 2013.

Harlan Cemetery (Hancock County, Indiana; 2 miles N of Wilkinson at Co. Rd. 1000 E and Co. Rd. 900 N, Brown township, Section 22), Isaac and Phebe VanDuyn marker, photographed by this author, March 2013.

To Isaac Van Duyn, one of my maternal 3rd great grandfathers. I do not know you, or what kind of person you were. I can surmise that you felt very strongly about keeping the Confederacy out of the North, as well as stopping their cause. I am sorry you experienced such physical loss, but I thank you for being a part of the terrible war that could have changed the face of this nation. Thank you for being a part of freeing so many people from the bonds of slavery. Thank you for sacrificing years of your life for others.

Forever grateful,
Elizabeth, daughter of Margaret, granddaughter of Carol, great granddaughter of Obe, 2nd great granddaughter of George, and your 3rd great granddaughter.


Suggested Reading


Citations

1.^ George Hazzard. Hazzard’s History of Henry County, Indiana, 1822-1906. Military ed. Published 1906 by G. Hazzard, author and publisher in Newcastle, Ind. On-line at Archive.org (https://archive.org/details/hazzardshistoryo01hazz : accessed 2 November 2015). Hereinafter referred to as G. Hazzard. History of Henry County, Indiana.

2.^ Harlan Cemetery (Hancock County, Indiana; 2 miles N of Wilkinson at Co. Rd. 1000 E and Co. Rd. 900 N, Brown township, Section 22), Isaac and Phebe VanDuyn marker, photographed by this author, March 2013. Hereinafter referred to as Harlan Cemetery, Hancock County, Indiana, Isaac and Phebe VanDuyn marker.

3.^ “Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XXFT-29X : accessed 6 November 2015), Isaac Vanduyn and Phebe Judg, 1845.

4.^ 1900 U.S. census, Hancock County, Indiana, population schedule, Brown Township, Enumeration District (ED) 37, sheet 1, p. 21A (stamped), dwelling 5, family 5, Geo. W. Vanduyn; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 November 2015), citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 375, FHL microfilm 1240375. The 1900 U.S. Federal Census, states that George’s birth month, year, and location are March 1846 in Iowa.

5.^ “Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XXFT-29X : accessed 6 November 2015), Isaac Vanduyn and Phebe Judg, 1845. Isaac and Phebe married in June of 1845 in Henry County, Indiana.

6.^ The Hancock Democrat (Greenfield, Indiana), Thursday, September 10, 1903, page 8, Newspapers.com. George’s obituary in 1930 says he was 84 years old when he died, also consistent with his being born in 1846.

7.^ “George Washington Van Duyn,” Find A Grave memorial, (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=38543271 : accessed 5 November 2015). Find A Grave. George’s grave stone says he was born in 1845. I believe that the grave stone is wrong and that he was born in 1846, based on other evidence I outline.

8.^ 1870 U.S. census, Hancock County, Indiana, population schedule, Brown Township, page 10 (handwritten), dwelling 69, family 69, line 1, George Vandine; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 November 2015), image 10 of 34; citing National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 320, page 302B, image 74; FHL microfilm 545819. Only the 1870 U.S. Federal Census gives George’s birth state as Indiana.

9.^ 1850 U.S. census, Lee County, Iowa, District 29, population schedule, page 443A (stamped), dwelling 838, family 844, line 30, Isaac Van Dyne; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 November 2015), image 7 of 107, citing National Archives microfilm publication M432, roll 186. Hereinafter referred to as 1850 U.S. census, Lee County, Iowa, District 29, population schedule, Isaac Van Dyne.

10.^ 1860 U.S. census, Brown Township, Hancock County, Indiana, population schedule, page 493 (large handwritten), dwelling 426, family 420, line 27, Isaac Vandine; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : 3 November 2015), image 29 of 30, citing National Archives microfilm publication M653, roll 263. Hereinafter referred to as 1860 U.S. census, Brown Township, Hancock County, Indiana, population schedule, Isaac Vandine.

11.^ Harlan Cemetery, Hancock County, Indiana, Isaac and Phebe VanDuyn marker.

12.^ Micki Jacobson. “Hans Richter, aka John Judge, and Mary/Polly Drake, and Their Descendants,” 23 March 2005; electronic copy held by Elizabeth Ballard as provided by Micki Jacobson [(E-ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE)], Texas, to Elizabeth Ballard (this author) via e-mail, 16 December 2013, “Judge/Drake Family Tree DNA.” Hereinafter referred to as M. Jacobson. Richter/Judge research document.

13.^ M. Jacobson. Richter/Judge research document.

14.^ M. Jacobson. Richter/Judge research document.

15.^ 1850 U.S. census, Lee County, Iowa, District 29, population schedule, Isaac Van Dyne.

16.^ 1850 U.S. census, Lee County, Iowa, District 29, population schedule, page 442B (stamped), dwelling 832, family 838, line 25, Mary Judge; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 November 2015), image 6 of 107, citing National Archives microfilm publication M432, roll 186.

17.^ 1850 U.S. census, Lee County, Iowa, District 29, population schedule, Isaac Van Dyne.

18.^ 1860 U.S. census, Brown Township, Hancock County, Indiana, population schedule, Isaac Vandine.

19.^ “U.S., Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934,” digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 November 2015); Isaac Vanduyn (Co. H, 69th Ind. Inf.) index card; imaged from General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934, T288 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives [n.d.]), roll 486.

20.^ G. Hazzard. History of Henry County, Indiana.

21.^ G. Hazzard. History of Henry County, Indiana.

22.^ G. Hazzard. History of Henry County, Indiana.

23.^ “U.S., Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934,” digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 November 2015); Isaac Vanduyn (Co. H, 69th Ind. Inf.) index card; imaged from General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934, T288 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives [n.d.]), roll 486.

24.^ Isaac and Phebe’s last four children were Warren, b. February 1864; Lydia, b. 20 March 1866; Isaac, Jr., b. 2 October 1869; and, Oren, b. 18 November 1872. If Isaac were continually away at war from 27 November 1862 until the discharge of the 69th Indiana Infantry Regiment on 5 July 1865, how would Warren have been conceived during that time? I wonder if Isaac was again furloughed home, or if Phebe was traveling with the 69th during the time she would have had to have conceived Warren. There is also the possibility that Warren’s biological father was not Isaac. Information that may answer some of these questions could be in Isaac’s military file.

25.^ The Hancock Democrat (Greenfield, Indiana), Thursday, September 10, 1903, page 8, Newspapers.com.

26.^ Harlan Cemetery, Hancock County, Indiana, Isaac and Phebe VanDuyn marker.

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8 Responses to Isaac VAN DUYN (1822-1903) – Willing to Fight, Lost His Sight – 52 Ancestors

  1. Melissa Middleswart says:

    I was just reading about my 5th great grandfather, Joseph Wright, who came from Ireland in 1801, walked from Baltimore Md. to what became Belmont County, Ohio and then back again to wait for his wife and children to come from Ireland, then they all went back and settled there and farmed. He later started a town which was called Wright’s Town, but became Belmont OH and is still there.

    Like

    • That is really a great legacy to have. I hope you write about it.

      Like

      • Melissa Middleswart says:

        We were extremely lucky, in that letters from our ancestor and his wife were included in one chapter of a book, Irish Immigrants in the Land of Canaan, and then we discovered the author had even more that he had not used, which he shared with us. So we have transcriptions of many old letters and one of Joseph’s son’s journals from mid-1800s, thanks to a good genealogist and distant cousin, a few years ago. I have reread them several times, and I marvel at all they went thru in those long-ago times.

        Like

  2. A sacrifice it was! Great read!!

    Like

  3. "Rob" VanDYNE says:

    Robt. A. VanDyne
    Below, Is this the order of children for Isaac & Pheobe [JUDGE] Vanduyn ?
    Geo. Washington 1846 – living. 1900
    Eliza Ann c1848 md. Thos. CRONK
    Margt. Ellen md. Austin BARRETT
    Columbus 1856-1931
    Sarah Cathr’n c1859
    Wallace Warren 1864
    Linnie Jane c1866 md. Oliver COON/KUHN
    Isaac 1868
    Hiland Mary
    Lydia Marinda d.pr.to 1903
    Elizabeth

    I like your reasoning as to WHY Isaac went to Iowa. Well thought out.
    Do you happen to know of a George bc1816 (where?) who went about the same time
    & ended up in what is present day Union Co,IA. This family ALSO went back to Indiana,
    George is not found in 1850 but the wife’s name was Rachel REASONER b. 1821
    Henry Co,IN d.1861 Union Co,IA d/o Garrett & Mary [REINEY] REASONER
    Even though the “mother” died in Union Co,IA. three of their children md. in or near
    Henry Co,IN

    I am NOT of this Vanduyn line, but a collection house for the name [all spellings]
    “Rob” VanDYNE of Wichita,KS

    Like

    • Rob, thank you for commenting. I am not familiar with a Rachel REASONER, but I am familiar with a Rebecca REASONOR who married a Josiah KOON on 6 December 1838 in Henry County, Indiana, USA. In 1860, they were living in Doyle Township, Clarke County, Iowa, USA. From census records, I calculated her birth year as about 1821, and she was born in Ohio. She died in 1887 and is buried in Doyle Township, Clarke County, Iowa, as is her husband Josiah KOON. He died in 1874. I haven’t researched this Rebecca REASONOR, so I know nothing of her siblings or parentage.

      I have not researched this George VAN DUYN you mention, but I should. It wouldn’t surprise me if he’s a brother or cousin of my Isaac, the subject of this story.

      Isaac and Phebe (JUDGE) VAN DUYN’s children from my own research, in birth order, with spouses:

      George W Van Duyn 1846–1930 [my 2nd great grandfather] m. Sarah A. TAGUE
      Eliza Ann Van Duyn 1848–1926 m. Thomas B. CRONK
      Margaret Ellen Van Duyn 1850–1913 m. Calvin Austin BARRETT
      Highland Mary Van Duyn 1853–1938 m. Daniel ENRIGHT
      Lena Jane Van Duyn 1854-1923 m. Oliver S. KUHN
      Columbus Charles VanDuyn 1855–1921 m. Lucinda I. DUDLEY
      Sarah Catherine Van Duyn 1857– m. Abijah A. SMITH
      Elizabeth A VanDuyn 1860–1942 m. Ira Allen CRAIG
      Warren Wallace Van Duyn 1864–1948 m. Ida Belle COOK; m. Nora Victoria STONE
      Lydia M Van Duyn 1866–1895 m. Martin L. CRAIG
      Isaac S Van Duyn 1869–1951 m. Amanda F. COON
      Oren V Van Duyn 1872–1951 m. Mary Etta BLAKE

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  4. Pingback: Diggin’ Up Graves – Favorite Posts of 2014 and 2015 | Diggin' Up Graves

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