Earl Lawrence TRAUTMAN (1893-1964) : “Auto Salesman Arraigned in Hit and Run” or How my Grandfather Got into the 1940 Census Twice – 52 Ancestors (Ancestor 4)

Earl Lawrence TRAUTMAN (1893-1964) : “Auto Salesman Arraigned in Hit and Run” or How my Grandfather Got into the 1940 Census Twice – 52 Ancestors

So today, I’m out and about to get groceries and such, and I’m backing up in this big, red SUV I’m sharing.1 I look in my rear view mirror and see what appears to be this huge metal light pole. I do not remember ever, ever seeing that huge metal light pole.

Now, my little red Ford Escort would have had no trouble with that at all. It actually never did – so much so that, like I said, I do not remember noticing that pole ever, ever before. I could do a complete 360 in my car (on a non-busy, 2 lane, city street; on a country road, it might land in a ditch). But in this monster SUV, I had to pull up, back up, pull up, back up, pull up, and back up, until I felt safe enough to go forward without taking out the SUV with the pole or the nearby parked cars and giant trucks.2

All the while, I was periodically glancing at the passenger side rear-view that has written on it, “Objects in mirror are closer than they appear.” Really? Really? How much closer can this giant metal pole be?

I made it home with no tragedies and no groceries. I’ll try again tomorrow.3

On top of that, there was this person who pulled up behind me at the stop sign near my house with her cell phone directly in front of her face while she rested her elbows on her steering wheel. At first, I didn’t know if she was taking a photo of me or texting while she was driving. I decided it was the latter, which was a bit of a relief.

On the plus side, her stupidity gave me my choice of ancestor for the week – my biological paternal grandfather, Earl Lawrence TRAUTMAN.

Earl Lawrence TRAUTMAN was born in Cleveland, Ohio, on 17 April 1893, to Charles TROUTMAN and Carrie TROUTMAN.4 Carrie’s maiden name was VIRKLER.5 Earl was, to my knowledge and current research, Carrie’s only known child.6

"Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X6KL-QLG : accessed 2 February 2014), Trotman Or Troutman, 17 Apr 1893; citing Birth, Cleveland, Cuyahoga, Ohio, reference , county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 1,851,367.

“Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X6KL-QLG : accessed 2 February 2014), Trotman Or Troutman, 17 Apr 1893; citing Birth, Cleveland, Cuyahoga, Ohio, county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 1,851,367.

On 16 October 1913, at the age of 20 (yes, he appears to have lied about his age when he got married), he and Adele ANTON were joined together as husband and wife.7 Adele Marie ANTON was the daughter of Henry ANTON and Marion (RENFRO) ANTON.8 Earl and Adele got married in Cleveland, which is a little odd since I suspect they met on the East Coast. In 1910, Earl was living at 221 W 120th St, Manhattan, New York, and Adele was living at 221 Baltic St, Elizabeth, New Jersey.9,10

I have wondered if Earl needed to go to Cleveland to get his birth record for marriage, or if the family that I suspect is his in Cleveland was involved in the wedding. Or if the couple was not old enough to get married in New York. I will continue to research with the hopes of understanding that.

"Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X8VL-RZ9 : accessed 21 July 2013), Earl L. Trautman and Adele Anton, 16 October 1913; citing Cuyahoga, Ohio, United States, reference an89679; county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 886,229.

“Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X8VL-RZ9 : accessed 21 July 2013), Earl L. Trautman and Adele Anton, 16 October 1913; citing Cuyahoga, Ohio, United States, reference an89679; county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 886,229.

In total, they had six children, but one is a mystery and died before my father was born.11 I have my dad’s birth certificate but none of his siblings’ yet.

The five known children of Earl Lawrence TRAUTMAN and Adele Marie (ANTON) TRAUTMAN were all presumably born on Staten Island. In their order of birth, they were as follows:

  1. Marion Rita TRAUTMAN, b. 5 December 1915
  2. Dorothy Veronica TRAUTMAN, b. 25 August 1917
  3. Henry Lawrence TRAUTMAN, b. 3 October 1918
  4. Adele Marie TRAUTMAN, b. 9 March 1922
  5. James Joseph TRAUTMAN, b. 19 January 192912

By 1915, the adults were all living together in Queens, New York: Henry ANTON, Marion ANTON, Earl TRAUTMAN, Adele TRAUTMAN, and Mary RENFRO (neé COTTER).13 Mary (COTTER) RENFRO was the mother of Marion (RENFRO) ANTON, who was the mother of Adele.14

Not in the household was my 2nd great grandfather, the father of Marion, and the husband of Mary, John Marion RENFRO.15 During his life, he ran around the country and had 6 or 7 wives – simultaneously.16 In 1916, John M. RENFRO  died in Kansas while living with his last wife and family.17

In that 1915 New York State Census, in the same household, were a Catherine BYRNES, age 37, and her son, William J. BYRNES, age 14.18 These names are new to me. After a little bit of digging, I have come to a preliminary conclusion that this Catherine’s maiden name may have been LOOMIS, that her middle initial was E, that she was informally called Kate, and that she may have been married to a William Joseph BYRNES.19 I have a gut feeling that she may have a blood relationship with Mary (COTTER) RENFRO, which could be a good thing, since finding the ancestry of a Mary COTTER whose parents were William COTTER and Catherine SHANAHAN, all three born in Ireland, seems daunting, and every little bit will help.20

By 1920, Earl and family were living in a rental at 139 Mountain View Avenue on Staten Island, Richmond County, New York.21 I tried to find the house or building on Google Maps, and it was either located where a full dumpster now sits, or was torn down to make the Staten Island Expressway. Not that I was thinking of going to go looking for it or anything. (I mean, what genealogist does that?)

There were 7 in the household, as follows:

Earl Trautman, head of household, male, white, 27, married
Adele Trautman, wife, female, white, 25, married
Marion Trautman, daughter, female, white, 4-11/12, single
Dorothy Trautman, daughter, female, white, 2-6/12, single
Henry Trautman, son, male, white, 1-5/12, single
Henry Anton, father-in-law, male, white, 46, married
Marion Anton, mother-in-law, female, white, 44, married22

The ages should be reported as of 1 January 1920.23 The census taker got the children’s months off a bit, based on the information I received from my aunt Dot (Dorothy in this census) in her adulthood.24

In the 1925 New York State Census, the family was finally living at 253 DuBois Avenue, West Brighton, Richmond County, New York (on Staten Island), in the house where my dad was born in 1929, but Earl TRAUTMAN was not in it.25 At that point, I would expect little girl Adele to have been in the census, and she was, age 4.26 I’m pretty sure if you subtract 1922 (her birth year) from 1925, you get 3. Perhaps the birthdate I have for Adele is off.27

There is a significant difference in age between my father’s sister Adele Marie TRAUTMAN, b. 1922, and my father, James Joseph TRAUTMAN, b. 1929. It is almost 7 years. Between these two children could have been the birth and death of the mystery child. We also have the missing Earl. He was not in the 1930 Federal Census with the family either, but my dad was, at a reported age of one year and 3 months.28

I do not know where Earl Lawrence TRAUTMAN was in 1925. I may have to look in the NY State Census the old fashioned way (with my eyes and no index). Or perhaps he was not in New York at all. However, in 1930, he was living as a “Roomer” with a middle-aged woman by the name of Minnie O’NEILL, a widow born in Ireland who rented at 1597 Castleton Avenue on Staten Island, and he reported himself as married.29

So sometime between the when he wasn’t in the household in 1925 and when he wasn’t in the household in 1930, he and my grandmother got together and made a baby or two. You may ask, “How do you know that your father was Earl Lawrence TRAUTMAN’s son, given that situation?” It’s very simple. We know I can’t go back in time and visually see who was in Adele’s bedroom in April or May of 1928.

But…

DNA.

Aside from the fact that my father’s birth certificate says that Earl’s residence was at 253 DuBois Avenue, the same as the birthplace.30 Aside from the fact that my grandmother Adele and Earl L. TRAUTMAN are listed as the parents on the same.31 Aside from the fact that all the kids looked alike – more alike than they would be if they were not full siblings – and that my father and his siblings were practically spitting images of each other.32 Aside from all of that…

DNA.

Unfortunately, I don’t have any photos of Earl. My guess is…garbage can at 253 DuBois Avenue, West Brighton, Staten Island, New York. Or maybe that dumpster near the Staten Island Expressway.

But ah, yes. DNA. How do I love thee?

On 20 December 2014, my Autosomal DNA results came back from one of the DNA testing companies. As I was learning the ropes of the interface, I found D and was ecstatic! She was my first known, and even a close, TRAUTMAN/TROUTMAN DNA match the three databases that contained my DNA results.

D also manages the kits for her brother and sister. I asked her if she would upload all three to GEDmatch, and she happily obliged.33 I’ve been studying our matching segments off and on since then, as well as her known family trail. I have also tweaked my Ancestry public tree which exists solely for AncestryDNA matching, and contains some speculation marked as such. I implemented Charles TROUTMAN’s ancestry as if he were the Charles William TROUTMAN related to D.34

This modification to my public, partially hypothetical tree brought up two new TROUTMAN-related and very significant “shakey leaves.”35 One was a person matched with a TROUTMAN couple and a TROUTMAN-related couple in my tree, and the other was a person matched with a different TROUTMAN-related couple in my tree. As we all know by now (or we should), this does not mean that their trees are correct (and we know mine is speculative), nor does it mean that the DNA segments on which we match are the ones that represent any of these ancestors.36 Nonetheless, this was huge, because the ancestors being represented are documented ancestors of that Charles William TROUTMAN of Cleveland who we know is related to D. And, for the purposes of this article, it shows that my father’s DNA is TRAUTMAN/TROUTMAN DNA.

I covered some of what I found in the article “Charles TROUTMAN, Take 4” last December.37 Regarding my father’s father, the only other thing that could give the same DNA results would be if my father’s father were a man who was related to Earl Lawrence TRAUTMAN with the same TRAUTMAN/TROUTMAN ancestry, but who was not Earl Lawrence TRAUTMAN. (Did you follow that? A brother or first cousin of Earl Lawrence TRAUTMAN.) I have absolutely no reason to believe that. Especially, not with the DNA and other evidence I’ve presented briefly here. (Or if I’m TRAUTMAN/TROUTMAN on my mother’s side, but I’ve got that covered, so – no.)

And now we come to the good part.

When the 1940 U.S. Federal Census became available, it was exciting to find my very own mommy listed as a 9-year old little girl, with the family as it should have been, in the house in which they should have lived.38

I also had been anticipating finding out what the elusive Earl TRAUTMAN had been up to by then. I found him in Glen Rock, Bergen County, New Jersey, living with his mother and her husband, James PHILP.39

So I probably put that in my records for him and went along my merry way, perhaps then getting caught up in researching somebody else until I came around back to Earl T. Eventually, I would have searched for him again to see what records I could find, maybe on FamilySearch, or maybe I just happened to notice Ancestry’s so-called “Smart Filter” setting and turned it off. From that subsequent search, up came a 1940 U.S. Federal Census record for an Earl TRAUTMAN in Passaic County, New Jersey, who fit the criteria for being my grandfather.40 Cool. Glad I found him. A bit surprised I hadn’t found him before, but that happens.

As I was putting that census information into my records, I noticed that I had already documented a 1940 census record for him – in Glen Rock, New Jersey. (I had found him two paragraphs ago, remember? Apparently, I did not remember.)

Surely this was not the same person. I was confused.

The 1940 Census instructions define the Census Day as beginning at “12:01 a. m. on April 1, 1940.”41 Persons that the census takers were to enumerate were “all men, women, and children (including infants) whose usual place of residence is in your district or who, if temporarily in your district, have no usual place of residence elsewhere.”42

That seems pretty clear, and that was my understanding. It still is.

So, how could somebody be in two census locations at the same time for the same year? Believe it or not, it seems that Earl Lawrence TRAUTMAN found a way.

First, two more applicable 1940 Census enumerators’ instructions.

There is a section on persons whom the census taker was not to enumerate, including this paragraph:

Persons who were formerly members of this household,
but have since become inmates of a jail; or a mental institution,
home for the aged, infirm or needy, reformatory, prison,
or any other institution in which the inmates may remain for
long periods of time.43

There is a section that covers what were called “Special Classes of Persons” and includes the following paragraph:

Your district may include a prison, reformatory, or jail, a home for orphans, for aged, infirm or needy persons, for blind, deaf, or incurable persons, a soldiers’ home, an asylum or hospital for the insane or the feeble-minded, or a similar institution in which the inmates usually remain for long periods of time. Enumerate all the inmates of such institutions at the institutions. Note that in the case of jails you must enumerate the prisoners there, however short the sentence.44

In the Passaic County census entry, Earl was not all warm and fuzzy and living with his mother. In the Passaic County census entry, Earl was in jail. The Passaic County Jail in Paterson, Passaic County, New Jersey.45

If we read the instructions I quoted above, it looks like everything should have been covered. If he was in jail on April 1st, he was in jail on April 1st. The Glen Rock, Bergen County, census taker would not enumerate him, and the Paterson, Passaic County, enumerator would. Easy, peasy.

But it was not easy, peasy. It didn’t work out like it should have, because the events leading up to his being jailed occurred on 31 March 1940, and he was arrested on the Census Day, 1 April 1940.

I. am. not. kidding. I could not make this up if I tried.

And that’s why we have two census records for Earl Lawrence TRAUTMAN in 1940.

Auto Salesman Arraigned in Hit and Run

Early Sunday morning, 31 March 1940, a man named Earl TRAUTMAN was driving a Ford V8 on the rainy streets of Paterson, New Jersey, when he hit pedestrian Joseph EREMICZ.46 Earl fled the scene, and Mr. EREMICZ died soon after he was hit, before police arrived.47

Earl was a resident of Glen Rock, New Jersey, and was an automobile salesman at J. P. Motors in Glen Rock.48 He was arrested on 1 April 1940, after eyewitness reports and investigative work led two detectives of Paterson to the Glen Rock automotive dealer’s shop where they found the car and received confirmation that Earl TRAUTMAN had used it.49

An article in the Paterson (New Jersey) Evening News, Tuesday, April 2, 1940, states the following:

The automobile salesman was brought to headquarters [on April 1st] where he denied being involved in any accident here. Finally, after persistent questioning, [Trautman] broke down and confessed he fled the scene of the fatal accident after a passing motorist had accused him of pushing the man from his car.50

Well, what do you know? He was captured on 1 April and thrown in jail. Of all days. And, OH, how glad I am that he was! If the hit and run had happened a few days earlier, or a few days later, it would have not been on the “census cusp.” It would not have been on my radar to check for Passaic County, New Jersey, newspapers or prison records for my grandfather. And while an exhaustive search does include doing more and more, sometimes genealogy finds are just lucky. After all, if you do not know what you need to find, you just don’t know.

He made bail on 3 April 1940, and that’s what I know for now about the case.51 He was charged with “causing a death by an automobile.”52 From the description of the accident in the paper, assuming he did not push the man out of the car, it seems that in today’s world that would be involuntary manslaughter. I will seek, and find, more information.

Earl Lawrence TRAUTMAN died on 7 January 1964, at the Bergen Pines Hospital in Paramus, Bergen County, New Jersey.53 The cause of death was Bronchogenic Carcinoma with Metastasis.54 Lung cancer. Metastasized lung cancer.

C. C. Van Emburgh, Inc. (Ridgewood, New Jersey) (ccve1895@aol.com), Funeral Home Record, Earl L Troutman, 7 January 1964; Scanned PDF Copy supplied via email to Elizabeth Wilson Ballard, 22 July 2013.

C. C. Van Emburgh, Inc. (Ridgewood, New Jersey) (ccve1895@aol.com), Funeral Home Record, Earl L Troutman, 7 January 1964; Scanned PDF Copy supplied via email to Elizabeth Wilson Ballard, 22 July 2013.

I talked to a paternal first cousin about a year ago on the telephone, and his exact words were, “The only time I ever saw Earl Trautman was in a bar drinking.”55 Earl Lawrence TRAUTMAN had a drinking problem, just like my dad.56 Alcoholism is hereditary.

And this brings us back to the beginning. The irony. My paternal grandfather, the automobile salesman, was charged with causing a death by automobile.

And those monster Ford V8s were red.57

Red 1940 Ford V-8 image from a Car Ad in a 1940 Colliers Magazine Advertisement. Used with permission of Dorothy Broome from her Etsy site at https://www.etsy.com/shop/dorothybroome.

Red 1940 Ford V-8 image from a Car Ad in a 1940 Colliers Magazine Advertisement. Used with permission of Dorothy Broome from her Etsy site at https://www.etsy.com/shop/dorothybroome.


Citations

1.^ It’s actually in my name, but I typically don’t drive it.

2.^ It’s really not a monster, and you can roll your eyes at me if you drive an SUV.

3.^ I actually did end up getting groceries the next day. It was cold and windy and snowing. I thought I had been transported one month ahead into December. How long did I sleep??

4.^ “Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X6KL-QLG : accessed 2 February 2014), Trotman Or Troutman, 17 Apr 1893; citing Birth, Cleveland, Cuyahoga, Ohio, county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 1,851,367. There is no name of the baby on this birth record. My knowledge of his first name came from my mother, and my knowledge of his middle name came from my aunt Dorothy Veronica Schafer, his daughter, now deceased.

5.^ “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X8XC-TMX : accessed 27 November 2015), Charles Troutman and Carrie Virkler, 3 February 1893; citing Cuyahoga, Ohio, United States, reference P 143; county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 877,928.

6.^ I have yet to find anything that even hints at her having more than one child, but if I find something, you’ll be some of the first people to know.

7.^ “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X8VL-RZ9 : accessed 21 July 2013), Earl L. Trautman and Adele Anton, 16 October 1913; citing Cuyahoga, Ohio, United States, reference an89679; county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 886,229.

8.^ 1900 U.S. census, Union County, New Jersey, population schedule, Elizabeth Ward 5, Enumeration District (ED) 102, sheet 10, p. 10B (stamped), dwelling 133 [recount that overwrites 139], family 200 [recount that overwrites 197], Henry Anton household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 November 2015), citing FHL microfilm 1,240,996. This household contains 4 individuals, including Mary Renfro, age 49, labeled as mother-in-law of Henry Anton. Regarding my grandmother Adele’s middle name of Marie, I have known it for so long, that I do not know where I learned it. Most likely, it was originally from my mother when I was a child.

9.^ 1910 U.S. census, New York County, New York, population schedule, Manhattan Ward 12, Enumeration District (ED) 559, sheet 3B, p. 7701 (script), dwelling 8, family 66, James Philip[Philp] household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 November 2015), citing FHL microfilm 1,375,035.

10.^ 1910 U.S. census, Union County, New Jersey, population schedule, Elizabeth Ward 5, Enumeration District (ED) 65, sheet 21B, p. 97 (stamped), dwelling 301, family 441, Henry Anton household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 November 2015), citing FHL microfilm 1,374,922.

11.^ Richmond County, New York City Birth Certificate no. 1929-174, James Joseph Trautman; Municipal Archives, New York City. The birth certificate has one box each for total number of children born to this mother, including this birth, and total currently living, including this birth. On James Joseph Trautman’s birth certificate, these numbers are 6 and 5, respectively.

12.^ Dorothy Schafer [now deceased], Brunswick, Georgia to Elizabeth E. Wilson, letters; Personal Correspondence, c. 1987-1991; Trautman Research Files; Privately held by Elizabeth Wilson Ballard, Muncie, Indiana.

13.^ 1915 New York state census, Queens County, population schedule, Assembly District (A.D.) 4, Election District (E.D.) 34, margins trimmed (no page numbers visible), Henry Anton household, unnumbered lines 42-48, 19 Pleasant Ave.; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 November 2015); citing State population census schedules, 1915. Albany, New York: New York State Archives.

14.^ Elizabeth Wilson Ballard, “COTTER and SHANAHAN – Kiss Me, I’m 1/16th Irish! – 52 Ancestors (2015 #11),” Diggin’ Up Graves (https://digginupgraves.wordpress.com : accessed 24 November 2015).

15.^ “New York, New York City Marriage Records, 1829-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:249K-3RZ : accessed 28 November 2015), John Renfro and Mary Cotter, 1 June 1873; citing Marriage, Manhattan, New York, New York, United States, New York City Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 1,561,968.

16.^ Elizabeth Wilson Ballard, “The Much Married Renfro – 52 Ancestors, 2015,” Diggin’ Up Graves (https://digginupgraves.wordpress.com : accessed 24 November 2015).

17.^ Elizabeth Wilson Ballard, “John Marion RENFRO – Union Soldier and Polygamist – 52 Ancestors,” Diggin’ Up Graves (https://digginupgraves.wordpress.com : accessed 24 November 2015).

18.^ 1915 New York state census, Queens County, population schedule, Assembly District (A.D.) 4, Election District (E.D.) 34, margins trimmed (no page numbers visible), Henry Anton household, unnumbered lines 42-48, 19 Pleasant Ave.; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 November 2015); citing State population census schedules, 1915. Albany, New York: New York State Archives.

19.^ “New York, New York City Births, 1846-1909,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:2WHM-4RV : accessed 28 November 2015), Catherine Loomis in entry for Clifford John Byrnes, 25 Jan 1906; citing Birth, Manhattan, New York, New York, United States, New York Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 1,984,864. This record is an example of the data I found on Catherine Byrnes. There is also a birth record each for children William and Katherine.

20.^ Elizabeth Wilson Ballard, “COTTER and SHANAHAN – Kiss Me, I’m 1/16th Irish! – 52 Ancestors (2015 #11),” Diggin’ Up Graves (https://digginupgraves.wordpress.com : accessed 24 November 2015).

21.^ 1920 U.S. census, Richmond County, New York, population schedule, Staten Island, Enumeration District (ED) 1568, sheet 5B, dwelling 91, family 98, Earl Trautman household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 November 2015), citing NARA microfilm T625, roll 1238.

22.^ Ibid.

23.^ U.S. Bureau of the Census, Fourteenth Decennial Census of the United States, Instructions to Enumerators (Washington, DC: 1919), p. 15, item 42; scanned PDF copy (http://www.census.gov : accessed 27 November 2015).

24.^ Dorothy Schafer [now deceased], Brunswick, Georgia to Elizabeth E. Wilson, letters; Personal Correspondence, c. 1987-1991; Trautman Research Files; Privately held by Elizabeth Wilson Ballard, Muncie, Indiana.

25.^ 1925 New York state census, Richmond County, population schedule, West New Brighton, Assembly District (A.D.) 1, Election District (E.D.) 27, Original, p. 30, Henry Anton household, lines 44-50, 253 DuBois Ave.; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 November 2015); citing State population census schedules, 1925. Albany, New York: New York State Archives.

26.^ Ibid.

27.^ I doubt it. Aunt Dot was her older sister.

28.^ 1930 U.S. census, Richmond County, New York, population schedule, Staten Island, Enumeration District (ED) 38, sheet 6B, p. 18 (stamped), dwelling 92, family 101, Henry Anton household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 November 2015), citing FHL microfilm 2,341,348.

29.^ 1930 U.S. census, Richmond County, New York, population schedule, Staten Island, Enumeration District (ED) 92, sheet 16A, p. 78 (stamped), dwelling 257, family 314, Minnie O’Neill household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 November 2015), citing FHL microfilm 2,341,350.

30.^ Richmond County, New York City Birth Certificate no. 1929-174, James Joseph Trautman; Municipal Archives, New York City.

31.^ Ibid.

32.^ I’m not kidding.

33.^ Judy G. Russell, “Gedmatch: a DNA geek’s dream site,” The Legal Genealogist (http://www.thelegalgenealogist.com : accessed 27 November 2015). In this article, Russell gives an overview of GEDmatch and some of its features.

34.^ Roberta Estes, “Getting the Most Out of AncestryDNA,” DNAeXplained – Genetic Genealogy (http://www.dna-explained.com : accessed 24 November 2015).

35.^ Ibid.

36.^ Roberta Estes, “Secondary Genealogical and Genetic Lines,” DNAeXplained – Genetic Genealogy (http://www.dna-explained.com : accessed 24 November 2015).

37.^ Elizabeth Wilson Ballard, “Charles Troutman, Take 4,” Diggin’ Up Graves (https://digginupgraves.wordpress.com : accessed 23 November 2015).

38.^ 1940 U.S. census, Delaware County, Indiana, population schedule, Muncie, Enumeration District (ED) 18-21, sheet 4A, p. 394 (stamped), visitation order 87, Carol Wilson household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 November 2015), citing NARA microfilm T627, roll 1037.

39.^ 1940 U.S. census, Bergen County, New Jersey, population schedule, Glen Rock, Enumeration District (ED) 2-144, sheet 10A, p. 2106 (stamped), visitation order 197, James Philp household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 November 2015), citing NARA microfilm T627, roll 2308.

40.^ 1940 U.S. census, Passaic County, New Jersey, population schedule, Paterson, Enumeration District (ED) 26-89, sheet 2A, p. 1150 (stamped), visitation order 21, line 31, Earl Trautman; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 November 2015), citing NARA microfilm T627, roll 2432.

41.^ U.S. Bureau of the Census, Sixteenth Decennial Census of the United States, Population and Agriculture Instructions to Enumerators (Washington, DC: 1940), unabridged, p. 14, item 301; scanned PDF copy, Census.gov (http://www.census.gov : accessed 24 November 2015).

42.^ Ibid., p. 14, item 304.

43.^ Ibid., p. 17, item 313h.

44.^ Ibid., p. 18, item 322.

45.^ 1940 U.S. census, Passaic County, New Jersey, population schedule, Paterson, Enumeration District (ED) 26-89, sheet 2A, p. 1150 (stamped), visitation order 21, line 31, Earl Trautman; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 November 2015), citing NARA microfilm T627, roll 2432.

46.^ “Auto Agent Arraigned In Hit-run Case,” Paterson (New Jersey) Evening News, Tuesday, April 2, 1940; Paterson (New Jersey) Free Public Library; Electronic version provided via email, 20 July 2013 by Robert Hazecamp, Jr., Trustee and the Library and Archives Chairman of the Passaic County (New Jersey) Historical Society, to Elizabeth Ballard.

47.^ Ibid.

48.^ Ibid.

49.^ Ibid.

50.^ Ibid.

51.^ Record of Commitments, Passaic County Jail, April 1940, p. 121, line 31, Earl Trautman; Electronic photographic copy provided via email, 2 July 2013 by Robert Hazecamp, Jr., Trustee and the Library and Archives Chairman of the Passaic County (New Jersey) Historical Society, to Elizabeth Ballard.

52.^ Ibid.

53.^ C. C. Van Emburgh, Inc. (Ridgewood, New Jersey) (ccve1895@aol.com), Funeral Home Record, Earl L Troutman, 7 January 1964; Scanned PDF Copy supplied via email to Elizabeth Wilson Ballard, 22 July 2013.

54.^ Ibid.

55.^ D.M., cousin, telephone call, 22 October 2014.

56.^ Elizabeth Wilson Ballard, “James Joseph WILSON (19 January 1929 – 21 March 1985) – 52 Ancestors (2015 #3),” Diggin’ Up Graves (https://digginupgraves.wordpress.com : accessed 23 November 2015).

57.^ Oh, I suppose they were also green, black, tan, grey, and other colors. I didn’t say they were only red, did I?

 

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4 Responses to Earl Lawrence TRAUTMAN (1893-1964) : “Auto Salesman Arraigned in Hit and Run” or How my Grandfather Got into the 1940 Census Twice – 52 Ancestors (Ancestor 4)

  1. its like bonny and clyde

    Like

  2. Pingback: Diggin’ Up Graves – Favorite Posts of 2014 and 2015 | Diggin' Up Graves

  3. Pingback: James Joseph WILSON (19 January 1929 – 21 March 1985) – 52 Ancestors (2015 #3) | Diggin' Up Graves

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